Thursday, March 31, 2011

Priest suspended

http://www.euroweeklynews.com/2011033186506/news/mallorca/can-picafort-priest-suspended-for-child-abuse-allegations.html
Can Picafort priest suspended for child abuse allegations Mallorca

Thursday, 31 March 2011 15:25 0 Comments 0ABUSE ALLEGATIONS: A dark cloud over Can Picafort
THE Mallorca Bishopric has suspended the Can Picafort parish priest from his duties following accusations of alleged sexual abuse to minors. This was revealed by a report contained in the online version of Spanish daily, Diario de Mallorca which also wrote that an exhaustive internal investigation is being carried out into the accusations against by the Mallorca Church.

Pere Barcelo is accused of molesting young girls in and out of the island more than a decade ago. It has not been revealed if there are any cases of alleged abuse in recent years.

The Bishop of Mallorca, Jesus Murgui informed the priest the decision, prohibiting him from giving mass both in Can Picafort as in any other parish.

He was reported to the Guardia Civil mid 1998 by a Christian teacher who claimed that months earlier he caught Barcelo in the rectory allegedly abusing a 10-year-old girl.

The teacher also gave the authorities a list of names of children who corroborated the priest’s alleged abuse.

The Balearics Public Prosecutor shelved the case after a few months, but reported the case to the Bishop at the time, Teodor Ubeda, but seemingly no action was taken until a journalist, Mateu Ferrer, exposed the alleged acts in a television documentary last October.

This weekend, parish priests from the north of Mallorca are expected to meet to decide who will take over the now vacant parish.

Pastor jailed

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/pastor-jailed-for-fondling-boy-2258568.html
Pastor jailed for fondling boy

By Matthew Holehouse, PA


Thursday, 31 March 2011
An evangelical pastor who fondled a teenage boy while he slept and touched a young preacher while sharing a hotel bed has been jailed for eight months.


Dr Albert Odulele, 47, admitted indecently assaulting the boy and sexually assaulting the man during a hearing at Bexley Magistrates' Court on March 3.


Today at Woolwich Crown Court, in London, he was jailed for eight months and six months respectively, to run concurrently, and put on the sex offenders' register for five years.


The court heard how Odulele, founder of the Glory House International Pentecostal church, would frequently share hotel beds while travelling the world with a large entourage of security and pastors.


In around 2003, he was watching television with a boy over whom he had "assumed paternal influence".


When the boy fell asleep he put his hand in his underwear and fondled him. The boy said he did not know what to do and was too scared to move.


Odulele's wife was pregnant with their daughter at the time.


The boy was left "traumatised" and lost interest in academic work, before telling his mother about the abuse.


When confronted by the boy's mother in spring last year, Odulele fell to his knees, crying and apologising, prosecutor Tom Nicholson told the court.


In 2004, he touched the inner thigh of a pastor while sharing a bed with him and another man at the Dartford Bridge Hilton.


The man brushed off the advances of Odulele, the "guiding light and father figure" of the church, before being touched again, the court heard.


Mr Nicholson said a number of church members challenged Odulele about his behaviour and appealed to a bishop of the church - without success.


Sentencing him, His Honour Judge Charles Byers described the attacks as "opportunistic".


Judge Byers said: "You were a man in a position of trust who was well respected. People turned to you for advice and no doubt for comfort."


He added that Odulele was an "intelligent man" who would have known his behaviour "was wrong".


In a pre-sentencing report Odulele, a trained medical doctor, said: "I am ashamed of my behaviour as homosexuality is at odds with my religious beliefs."


"I am extremely distraught and upset at the hurt and distress I have caused the victims."


Craig Crosbie, defending, said Odulele, the son of a Nigerian civil servant who came to Britain in 1986, has no previous convictions.


Glory House International, based in east London, claims to have a congregation of 3,000 and branches in Leeds, Birmingham and Brazil.


At his height Odulele would preach to 140,000 people at a time in stadia in Africa and the United States, the prosecution said.


Odulele was a major figure in Christian evangelism.


Odulele initially denied the crimes but later admitted to police he had been "battling" with his sexuality for years.


Glory House International is a registered charity with a turnover of £2 million a year.

Priest's past

http://www.bristolpress.com/articles/2011/03/31/news/doc4d93eec94439d873425785.txt
Priest in sex abuse settlement had varied ties to area

Thursday, March 31, 2011 9:35 AM EDT


By Lisa Backus
Staff Writer

A priest recently identified as part of a sexual abuse settlement led congregations in Bristol and Plainville for many years while also serving as a minister at a local high school.

According to papers filed in a Hartford court in 2009, the Archdiocese of Hartford approved a settlement of more than $20,000 for Jeff Libby, a 48-year-old former Bristol resident now incarcerated in Maine. Libby claims he was repeatedly abused by the Rev. Richard McGann in the 1970s.

McGann was pastor of St. Gregory the Great Church on Maltby Street in Bristol from 1975 to 1977, when the abuse allegedly occurred, court papers show. McGann went on to serve as a chaplain at Hartford Hospital and a pastoral minister at St. Paul High School before being assigned as pastor of Our Lady of Mercy Church in Plainville in 1987.

McGann was placed on administrative leave from Our Lady of Mercy in 2005, archdiocese spokesperson Maria Zone said, declining to comment on the settlement. While on administrative leave, McGann cannot perform the functions of a priest, such as serve communion. He has not been stripped of his status as a priest, Zone said.

The archdiocese does not know where McGann is now living, she said. Attempts to reach McGann on Wednesday were unsuccessful.

“It is the policy of the archdiocese not to comment on specific settlements,” Zone said in a prepared statement. “But it is important that the public know that the Archdiocese of Hartford is doing everything possible to keep our youth safe.”

The archdiocese now requires all clergy, staff and volunteers to complete a “safe environment” curriculum that includes background checks and sexual abuse awareness training, she said.

A woman who answered the phone Wednesday at St. Gregory, and another who answered at Our Lady of Mercy, declined comment. St. Paul High School Principal Cary Dupont, who attended the school as a student, Wednesday said he did not recall McGann and could not speak to the accusations.

Libby was about 12 years old when the abuse began, said his attorney in Maine, Richard Olson. Libby’s family lived in the Bristol area at the time, he said. Libby is serving a 60-year prison in Maine for drowning his grandfather more than 25 years ago. He was in denial about the abuse for years until he sought help while in prison, Olson said.

“Jeff’s position is that had a judge known about the situation he would have considered it a mitigating factor in sentencing,” Olson said. “Jeff has sought help from the archdiocese in Maine and Hartford in asking for a hearing on a reduction of the sentence, but they have been silent.”

The settlement and allegations came to light Monday during a news conference in Hartford held by David Clohessy, director of the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests. The 10,000-member national organization works to publicly identify clergy or church employees who have been the subject of sexual abuse settlements or criminal charges, said Clohessy, explaining that he suffered abuse at the hands of a priest in the 1970s.

“We work to heal the wounded and protect the vulnerable,” he said Wednesday. “We are hoping to spare some other child the horror we went through.”

Clohessy learned of Libby’s allegations and the settlement about a month ago, he said. He traveled from St. Louis to stage the news conference about McGann and another in Bridgeport about three other Connecticut clergy staff members also accused of abuse. Based on figures provided by the Boston-based research group Bishopaccountability.org, Clohessy said there are 28 clerics publicly accused of child molestation in the Archdiocese of Hartford.

Olson said Libby unsuccessfully petitioned the Maine court for a clemency hearing last year. Libby will try again in the spring, he said.

Archdiocese officials and Clohessy said McGann’s whereabouts are unknown. Since the statute of limitations has run out, McGann can not be charged with a crime, Olson said.

“Here is a situation where the church won’t even try to make this right,” Olson said. “There is a time when a real pastoral leader stops looking at the liability and what the lawyers are saying and says, ‘What should I do?’ There are lots of things the church should be doing for Jeff Libby and others.”

Bethany Home

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/survivors-want-bethany-home-in-redress-scheme-149715.html

Survivors want Bethany Home in redress scheme
By Jennifer Hough

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

THE survivors of a Protestant home for unmarried mothers where more than 200 babies died have asked for the Government’s position on including it in the redress scheme.

Just last October, while in opposition, Junior Minister Kathleen Lynch said the Government must "do the decent thing and end this outrage".

The Bethany Survivors Group, headed by Derek Leinster, has fought for years to have the home recognised as a state-run institution, despite what it calls a "cover up" to exclude it from the Residential Institutions Redress Scheme.

According to Mr Leinster, the state is as culpable for scores of deaths and abuse that went on in the home as it is for similar Catholic Church-run institutions and this must be recognised.

The Bethany Home took in non-Catholic unmarried mothers, their children, along with prostitutes and women, including children, convicted of various crimes between 1922-72.

The campaign came to a head last year when it emerged that in the 1930s and 1940s, some 219 children died at the home and were buried in unmarked graves at Mount Jerome.

The campaign was backed by Labour’s Joe Costello and Kathleen Lynch, who is now the Junior Minister for Mental Health and Disability. Ms Lynch said the continued refusal of the Government to include former residents of the Bethany Homes and the Magdalene Laundries under the provisions of the redress scheme was a "running sore".

"Despite continual calls the Department of Education has refused again and again to allow these institutions to be included in the list of qualifying institutions. As a result, the survivors have been deprived of the opportunity of having their case heard and of obtaining some justice and redress for the abuse they suffered as young, innocent and vulnerable children."

Mr Leinster said he wanted to know if Labour was going to stick to its promise. "The Bethany Home is eminently qualified to be included in the redress schedule," he said.

"It is too late for the 219 Bethany children buried in unmarked graves, whose final resting spot in Mount Jerome Cemetery was discovered in 2010. It is not yet too late for those still living."



Read more: http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/survivors-want-bethany-home-in-redress-scheme-149715.html#ixzz1IBb1QTdf

Convicted predators

http://www.theindychannel.com/news/27379057/detail.html
Convicted Predators Speak Frankly On Luring Young Victims

POSTED: 11:02 pm EDT March 30, 2011

MUNCIE, Ind. -- A handful of convicted sex offenders spoke frankly to 100 strangers Wednesday night in Muncie, with no questions off limits.

The workshop was a first-of-its-kind event put on by the Family Services Society to prevent future abuse, 6News' Tanya Spencer reported.

As offenders spoke candidly about the crimes that put them in jail, two of the panelists said they assaulted young girls they had just met. One abused his own daughter and another was a church mentor.



The offenders talked about how they justified their actions in their minds.

"I moan and gripe and complain about the children that are wearing pants that's got "sexy" (written) on the back. Why do you want to put a word on your 12-, 14- or 16-year-old daughter's butt? I mean, is that not trying to draw attention to her?" said one sex offender, who met his teenage victim online. He blamed pornography for fueling his addiction to sex.

All of the panelists agreed that they thought only of their own gratification during their crimes, never about the effect on their victims.Parents came to the workshop looking for answers.

"(I want) to see how these folks operate and get insight to see where I can stand to protect my own children," said Dwight Martin, a father of a 5-year-old.

"(I wanted) to make sure that I know what to look for to keep my kids safe," said Brandy Martin, Dwight's wife.

"I have three little children. I have a 4-year-old, a 1-year-old and a 3-month-old. That's my worst fear ever is that something awful like that could happen to them," said parent Sandrina Saintignon.

Counselors with the Family Services Society said unfortunately there's no known set of characteristics or personality traits that will help parents identify an offender. They also said that 90 percent of sexual abuse is committed by someone the victim knows and trusts.

The best advice from those who know best how to lure young victims is to talk to and listen to kids.

Let them know they're loved unconditionally and that they can share anything with you. Also, pay close attention to any change in their behavior.

"It (the sexual abuse) changed how she (his 13-year-old daughter) acted towards me," said one offender, "So, if you see a change toward a family member or friend, pay attention to it. Ask questions."

Experts said one in three girls and one in six boys will be molested in their lifetime.

Experts also said 88 percent of sexual abuse cases are never reported.

The Family Services Society has done panels like Wednesday's before for small groups, but this was the first that was open to the public.

Event organizers said they may offer more sessions in the future.

International conspiracy

http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20110330/ARTICLES/110339929?Title=Molest-suit-From-Santa-Rosa-to-Dublin
Molest suit: From Santa Rosa to Dublin
Arcata man, 38, identifies himself as boyhood victim
By JEFF CHIU/Associated Press Greg Horne, right, listens as attorney Joseph George speaks about allegations of abuse by Father Patrick McCabe at a news conference in Burlingame on Wednesday.

By SAM SCOTT
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT


Published: Wednesday, March 30, 2011 at 3:00 a.m.
Last Modified: Wednesday, March 30, 2011 at 9:09 p.m.
( page all of 3 )

Four men who claim they were molested by a Humboldt County priest in the 1980s have dropped their case against the Catholic Diocese of Santa Rosa. But only so they can expand their target to include “an international conspiracy” that extends to Ireland, their attorneys said.

Related Links:Former Santa Rosa Diocese priest to appeal extradition to Ireland Former altar boy describes aftermath of alleged abuse by Eureka priest Eureka man says priest molested several children at a time Lawsuit: Humboldt man molested as a child by Santa Rosa Diocese priest Pedophile priest sent to North Coast in '80s The new suit will take aim not only the local diocese, but the Archdiocese of Dublin and the Catholic order that treated the priest for pedophilia, attorney Joseph George said Wednesday.

The legal action will allege negligence, fraud and conspiracy against leaders of the three organizations that helped transfer the Rev. Patrick McCabe from pulpits in Ireland to California despite knowing his deep problems.

A 2009 report commissioned by the Irish government said the Santa Rosa bishop at the time, the late Mark Hurley, accepted McCabe knowing he'd been treated for pedophilia at a Catholic facility in New Mexico.

McCabe served as priest in St. Bernard Parish in Eureka from 1983 to 1985 when he was removed after a complaint he had children sit on his knee during confession. He then served briefly at St. Elizabeth Parish in Guerneville before being removed as a priest in 1988. Local allegations against him surfaced last year after news of his arrest. The 75-year-old is being in held in an Alameda County jail pending extradition to Ireland to face charges of molesting six boys from 1973 to 1981.

Greg Horne, 38, of Arcata, identified himself publicly for the first time Wednesday as one of the four men involved in the case. He said he was stunned and numb after reading about McCabe's arrest and realizing his alleged crimes were part of a larger pattern.

When he was a boy, McCabe used to babysit him in the rectory while his mother worked bingo games in the Eureka church to help pay his tuition to Catholic school, he said. The priest took advantage of the time alone to fondle him and rub himself against him, he said.

“He knew he had a solid amount of time every single Wednesday and he could just take his time,” Horne said at a news conference in Burlingame arranged by his attorneys. “It was almost like a game to him.”

Lawyers for the Santa Rosa diocese claim there's no evidence of misconduct in McCabe's file and no evidence that Bishop Hurley was aware of it. Also, the statue of limitations for the allegations at the heart of the matter has expired. Claims of childhood sexual misconduct expire on a person's 26th birthday.

“The Court of Appeals has said, ‘I don't care what label you put on it, it's a claim for childhood sexual abuse, which is covered by this particular statute of limitations and that statute has run out,” said Adrienne Moran, an attorney for the Santa Rosa diocese.

The attorneys threatening to file the new case blame all parties, including the Servants of the Paraclete, the Catholic congregation that ran the clinic that treated McCabe. The lawyers said the treatment facility should have done more to stop him from resuming pastoral duties.

“It really is an international conspiracy,” said Jeff Anderson, a Minnesota attorney who joined the four men's team as one of the country's most active lawyers in clergy sexual abuse cases. “We have a well-documented evidentiary trail going back to Dublin. We also have international movement of a known offender by top officials from several entities.”

George said the new case would be filed next month in Sonoma County Superior Court and that Anderson was headed to Ireland this week to speak with more victims and attorneys to gather additional evidence. He said the shift in tactics was to bring action against all responsible parties, not just the local diocese. Additionally, he said much of the evidence for the case is in Dublin.

Horne, who said only that he works in law enforcement, said he's not concerned about winning money. He just wants to do his part from stopping it from happening again, which is why he reluctantly went public.

“There's not enough money printed in the world to buy back what I had taken,” Horne said.

Priest accused

http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/crime_and_courts/article_50054090-5b10-11e0-b4ba-001cc4c002e0.html
Madison priest accused of sexual assault of girl
A Madison priest allegedly fondled a teenage girl in Stevens Point and at her Monona home in 2003 and 2004, then threatened to sue the girl and her cousin for slander to stop them from telling other people about the incidents, according to a criminal complaint filed Wednesday.

The Rev. Joseph Gibbs Clauder, 64, allegedly told the girl that if she told anyone else what he had done she would not go to heaven, and said nobody in her family would believe her, according to the complaint filed in Dane County Circuit Court.

She was 14 and 15 years old when the incidents are alleged to have happened. She said she did not reveal them until 2009, when she was 20, because she was afraid of Clauder, and even said she was afraid to go to heaven because he could be there.

"I never want to be near him," she told a nurse, her parish priest and family members in February 2009.

Clauder, who was removed from public life as a priest by the Madison Diocese in 1999 because of a separate allegation of sexual misconduct involving an adult woman, was charged with sexual assault of a child under the age of 16, a felony that carries a penalty of up to 40 years of combined prison and extended supervision.

Clauder is scheduled to appear in court on Thursday morning. Court records do not name a lawyer for Clauder, who does not have a listed telephone number. His former lawyer, Richard Auerbach, who is mentioned several times in the complaint, is on vacation and could not be reached for comment, his office said.

In his career Clauder was an associate priest at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Monona, an associate priest at St. Dennis Parish in Madison and a chaplain at Madison General Hospital, renamed Meriter in 1987.

Madison Catholic Diocese spokesman Brent King said that after Clauder was removed from public ministry in 1999 he has had no role or assignment within the church but has been provided a retired priest's stipend.

In August, the diocese's sexual abuse review board found the girl's allegations to be "credible and probable," the complaint states. Bishop Robert Morlino referred the case to the Vatican, which told the diocese to proceed with a canonical trial, which will be pursued after the end of any criminal or civil trial against Clauder, the diocese said.

The diocese said police were not contacted after initially learning of the alleged sexual abuse because the victim was an adult and had said she wanted to handle it within the church.

Admin leave for 2 more priests

http://www.beaumontenterprise.com/news/article/2-retired-priests-put-on-leave-by-Philly-diocese-1314817.php
2 retired priests put on leave by Philly diocese
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has placed two retired priests on administrative leave, bringing to 23 the number of priests suspended following a scathing grand jury report that accused church officials of protecting predator priests.

Cardinal Justin Rigali placed the unidentified priests on leave Wednesday pending an investigation.

One priest retired in 2006 and has assisted at parishes in another diocese where he lives. That diocese has been informed of the suspension. The other priest retired in 2005 and is not serving in any public ministry.

Last month a grand jury blasted the diocese in a report that charged two priests, a former priest and a Catholic school teacher. A former high-ranking church official was also accused of transferring problem priests without warning anyone at their new parishes of sex-abuse complaints.
..

Read more: http://www.beaumontenterprise.com/news/article/2-retired-priests-put-on-leave-by-Philly-diocese-1314817.php#ixzz1IBKTpXFn

Compensation

http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/sns-rt-life-us-belgium-abutre72t5ze-20110330,0,6780136.story
Belgian panel asks church to compensate abuse victims

Reuters

2:48 p.m. EDT, March 30, 2011

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - A Belgian parliamentary inquiry asked the Catholic Church Wednesday to compensate people who were abused by priests as children.

Widespread sexual abuse of minors by Belgian clerics has driven at least 13 people to suicide, a Church commission said last year.

"We recommend that the church puts in place an arbitration commission to be able to compensate the victims even if the facts are very old," said Lalieux Karine, the president of the inquiry. "It's money, but if they want a moral recognition they also can (ask for it)."

Belgium's lower house set up the inquiry to examine an issue that has rocked the Catholic Church across the world and resulted in hundreds of victims coming forward.

Earlier this month Germany's Catholic Church put forward a plan to compensate victims of sexual abuse by its priests, offering payments of up to 5,000 euros ($7,032) to those whose cases were too old to bring to court.

Pope Benedict met victims of abuse by priests during his April 2008 visit to the United States. The U.S. church has paid $2 billion in settlements to victims since 1992.

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Teacher accused

http://www.thespec.com/news/local/article/508903--cathedral-teacher-accused-of-attacking-student-in-empty-classroom
Cathedral teacher accused of attacking student in empty classroom
Cathedral Catholic...JGrazianoCathedral Catholic Secondary teacher Giuseppe Graziano faces sex assault charges arising from an attack on a student in an emplty school classroom
A Hamilton Catholic high school teacher has been charged with sexually assaulting a student.
Police allege Giuseppe (Joe) Graziano, who has been teaching cosmetology and Spanish at Cathedral High School for the past 14 years, approached a student at school in January and asked for sex.


Police and school officials would not reveal the student's gender, age or grade.

In February, according to the Hamilton police child abuse branch, Graziano sexually assaulted the student in an empty classroom.


Five hours after Graziano's arrest Tuesday morning, Hamilton Wentworth District Catholic School Board officials held a news conference at the central Hamilton high school.

"A student confided in a staff member on Feb. 9, " who brought the information to the principal's attention the next day, said HWCSB chairperson Pat Daly. Police were then contacted and Graziano was sent home immediately and placed on administrative leave. School officials also notified the Ontario College of Teachers.

Graziano was arrested and charged Tuesday around 10:30 a.m. after a joint investigation by police and the Catholic Children's Aid Society.


"This matter … is of deep concern to us and deeply saddens all of us beyond Cathedral and indeed our entire system, " Daly said. "Saying that, however, we respect due process and understand this is now a legal matter.

"Our first priority of concern is for the alleged victim and our prayers and support go out to that student."

While Cathedral students were praying unawares in a hastily called school assembly, school principal Sara Cannon broke the news of Graziano's arrest to his colleagues in a separate meeting.

"This is clearly deeply distressing … You can appreciate that this was shocking news to (staff). The wind has been knocked out of everyone, for sure, " Daly said.

At the end of the day, students were informed of the arrest by their teachers and given a letter to take home to their parents and caregivers.

"They were very shocked, " Cannon said.

"It took some time to absorb. Many of them were very quiet and many were in a pensive, reflective mood."

The school board brought crisis counsellors into the school for staff and students and will keep them at Cathedral as needed, Daly said.

Graziano, 51, of Stoney Creek, has been charged with two counts of invitation to sexual touching, sexual assault, and sexual interference.

Child abuse investigators believe there could be other victims. Anyone with further information is asked to call Detective Brandi Frazier at 905-546-3855.

"If a child came home with any concerns regarding this issue in any way, (parents) should contact Mrs. Cannon and/or police, " Daly said.

No contest

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/tx/7497272.html
Dallas-area priest pleads no contest to assault
© 2011 The Associated Press
March 30, 2011, 8:11AM
[X]ROWLETT, Texas — A Dallas-area priest has been put on probation after pleading no contest to misdemeanor assault over the inappropriate touching of a 14-year-old girl.

The Dallas Morning News reported Wednesday that the Rev. Bob Crisp had been a priest at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Rowlett for a decade. The 62-year-old priest was put on leave last April.

Crisp pleaded no contest Tuesday in Rowlett Municipal Court and received six months of deferred adjudication, plus was fined $650 over the summer 2009 incident. He could not immediately be reached for comment.

Investigators say Crisp slipped off his shoe and rubbed his bare foot on the girl's leg, while complimenting her pedicure and her footwear, in an incident near the church.

A diocese spokeswoman says there are no plans to reassign Crisp.

Crimes concealed

http://mnsnap.wordpress.com/snap-wisconsin/
New court documents:

Marquette University President Fr. Robert Wild left nation’s most prominent priest pedophile in ministry

As Jesuit provincial between 1985 to 1991, Wild concealed Fr. Donald McGuire’s criminal history, left him unsupervised

McGuire, prosecuted in Wisconsin and now in Federal prison, went on to molest children for another decade

Group again urging Jesuits officials to “come clean” about their child molesting clerics

WHAT: At a sidewalk news conference survivors of childhood sexual abuse by clergy will release and discuss new secret church documents that show that Fr. Robert Wild, President of Marquette University, concealed the crimes of Fr. Donald McGuire during his tenure as Provincial of the Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits). After remarks survivors will attempt to hand deliver a letter to Fr. Robert Wild urging him to:

–publically apologize to victims of pedophile priest Fr. Donald McGuire and their families for his failure to remove McGuire from the priesthood, report McGuire to the police, and alert the public of McGuire’s criminal history against children,

–provide to the Marquette community, to Catholics and the public, a detailed account of his involvement, and those of his colleagues in the Chicago Province, in the decades long cover up of Fr. Donald McGuire’s sexually abusive history and the withholding of key documents to law enforcement officials during McGuire’s 2006 Wisconsin prosecution,

–Join victim/survivors and insist that Jesuit officials immediately create a public registry of all Jesuits in the Wisconsin, Chicago and other provinces who have substantiated reports of sexual abuse of children.

WHO: 3-4 members of SNAP, the Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests, the world’s oldest and largest support group for clergy abuse victims, including the group’s longtime Midwest Director.

WHERE: Outside the entrance of Zilber Hall, Marquette University, 1250 W. Wisconsin Avenue, Milwaukee

WHEN: Wednesday, March 30, 11:30 a.m.

DOCUMENTS: The complete Jesuit and court documents, along with victim testimony, will be posted on the Boston based online research archive, BishopAccoutability.org at this link: Jesuits and Donald McGuire SJ A Management History

WHY: A new child sex abuse lawsuit filed in Chicago yesterday containing hundreds of never before seen church documents and depositions of top Jesuit officials, including current Marquette University President Fr. Robert Wild, show a pattern and practice of four decades of cover up by the Jesuit order concerning one of the nation’s most infamous pedophile priests.

The Jesuits are the largest Catholic religious order in the world, their high schools and universities some of the most elite educational institutions in the United States.

The priest whose child sex crimes Wild is shown to have concealed in the new documents is Fr. Donald McGuire, one of the most infamous priest sex offenders in US history. According to the documents, McGuire, now age 80, was known by Jesuit officials to have sexually assaulted children or been engaged in sexual misconduct for almost four decades. During this time, McGuire skyrocketed to fame as a spiritual advisor to Mother Theresa and the nuns of her international religious order.

In 2006, McGuire was found guilty of multiple counts of child sex assault in Walworth County, Wisconsin. In 2009 he was convicted on federal charges in Illinois for taking children across state and international boundaries to sexually assault them. Today McGuire is serving a 25 year sentence.

Wild, currently the President of Marquette University, served as the head of the Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus, or Jesuits from 1985 to 1991, during which time he assumed responsibility for McGuire and other Jesuit sex offenders.

When Wild assumed responsibility for McGuire in 1985, the Jesuits had already documented numerous reports of sexually assaulting children and sexual misconduct by McGuire spanning nearly 20 years. Not only had McGuire been secretly fired from two posts, including Loyola Preparatory Academy in Chicago, when Wild became his direct supervisor, McGuire had just been banned permanently from working or living in the archdiocese of Los Angeles and returned to Chicago.

While under Wild’s supervision, McGuire continued his prolific criminal assaults of children, unabated, recruiting victims from devout Catholic families from Illinois and around the United States. McGuire, a leading Jesuit retreat master, frequently used the Catholic confessional practice to commit his crimes, and his connection with Mother Theresa to gain the trust and confidence of scores of devout and unsuspecting parents and youngsters.

Wild assigned McGuire to Canisius House, a Jesuit community in Evanston Illinois in 1987, despite his sexual abuse history, where McGuire launched his worldwide retreat ministry, traveling the world unsupervised, often accompanied by children.

In 1991 Wild received a report from Brother Ricardo Palacio, a retreat director in California, who was alarmed that McGuire was conducting a youth retreat at his center and concerned about inappropriate behavior with a youngster. Wild, according to the testimony under oath by Palacio, informed Palacio by phone that the Jesuits had previous reports on McGuire’s sexual misconduct with children.

Despite Palacio’s testimony, Wild said in a 2009 deposition that there were no documents concerning McGuire in his Jesuit file and that he created his own “confidential” file for McGuire in 1991. Court documents support Palacio’s and not Wild’s claim.

This is not the first time Jesuit officials may have mislead the courts about abuse documents in McGuire’s file. During McGuire’s Wisconsin prosecution in 2006, Jesuit attorneys wrote Walworth County District Attorney Phil Koss that “we have very little with respect to Father McGuire, failing to mention any of the thousands of pages of documents that the Jesuits possessed directly related to allegations reported against McGuire over a period of 40 years.

Although Wild suggested to McGuire he stop traveling with children for “his prudent protection,” a suggestion McGuire obviously ignored, at no time did Wild report McGuire to police, warn parents or families of McGuire’s history, conduct or order a Jesuit investigation into McGuire’s behavior. As a result, McGuire went on to sexually assault more children for at least another decade.

SNAP official last week in Milwaukee released documents showing that another Jesuit priest with a prior history of sexual misconduct, Fr. Perry Robinson, had only last month been secretly removed from ministry. The group, which charge the Jesuits with an “appalling lack of transparency and accountability” concerning sex offenders like Robinson and McGuire, will be calling on Wild directly to join them in urging a “new era” of openness and public safety” by immediately publishing a registry of all known Jesuit sex offenders. The Jesuits have released no information concerning the number, identities, or current and past assignment histories of clerics who have assaulted children.

Wild will be retiring as Marquette’s President later this year.

Suicide

http://delcotimes.com/articles/2011/03/29/news/doc4d929db427716818668865.txt
.Archdiocese to be hit with another abuse suit
Published: Tuesday, March 29, 2011

0diggsdigg ShareThis2By Patti Mengers, pmengers@delcotimes.com
The family of a Bucks County man who claims he committed suicide after Archdiocese of Philadelphia officials dismissed his allegation of clerical sexual abuse is expected to file a wrongful death suit against the archdiocese today.

The family alleges the man, who was 36 when he died, was molested by the Rev. Joseph Gallagher while he was an altar boy at St. Mark parish in Bristol, Bucks County. Gallagher served as assistant pastor at the former St. Michael's Church in Chester from June 1970 until October 1974.

Now retired, Gallagher was last listed by archdiocesan officials as pastor emeritus at St. Richard parish in Northeast Phialdelphia since October 2006. He is currently relieved of his priestly duties and living in a private residence while an archdiocesan team led by former Philadelphia Assistant District Attorney Gina Maisto Smith, reviews the sexual abuse allegations.

He was among 24 priests suspended last month by archdiocesan officials after they were mentioned as suspects in a Philadelphia grand jury report on clerical sexual abuse of children. The grand jury accused archdiocesan officials of downplaying at least two complaints that Gallagher molested boys including one identified as "Ben" whose family is expected to file the wrongful death suit. His family maintains that Ben committed suicide after archdiocesan officials dismissed his abuse allegations that he made to them in 2007.

Attorneys in the case are Dan Monhan of Chester County and Marci Hamilton of Bucks County who are working in conjunction with Jeff Anderson, an internationally-known expert in sexual abuse litigation based in St. Paul, Minn. They are also representing Frank Finnegan of Collingdale in a lawsuit against archdiocesan officials in connection with alleged abuse when he was a boy at St. Francix Xavier parish, Philadelphia, by the now-late Rev. John Kline.

The recent grand jury investigation, that was launched by District Attorney Seth Williams, resulted in the Feb. 10 arrest of two priests, one former priest and a former Catholic school lay teacher for sexually assaulting two boys in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Also arrested for endangering the welfare of children was the Rev. Monsignor William Lynn, who, as secretary of the clergy under the former Philadelphia archbishop, Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, was responsible for investigating clerical sexual abuse. He is reportedly the highest ranking U.S. church official ever charged with child endangerment.
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By Patti Mengers, pmengers@delcotimes.com

The family of a Bucks County man who claims he committed suicide after Archdiocese of Philadelphia officials dismissed his allegation of clerical sexual abuse is expected to file a wrongful death suit against the archdiocese today.

The family alleges the man, who was 36 when he died, was molested by the Rev. Joseph Gallagher while he was an altar boy at St. Mark parish in Bristol, Bucks County. Gallagher served as assistant pastor at the former St. Michael's Church in Chester from June 1970 until October 1974.

Now retired, Gallagher was last listed by archdiocesan officials as pastor emeritus at St. Richard parish in Northeast Phialdelphia since October 2006. He is currently relieved of his priestly duties and living in a private residence while an archdiocesan team led by former Philadelphia Assistant District Attorney Gina Maisto Smith, reviews the sexual abuse allegations.

He was among 24 priests suspended last month by archdiocesan officials after they were mentioned as suspects in a Philadelphia grand jury report on clerical sexual abuse of children. The grand jury accused archdiocesan officials of downplaying at least two complaints that Gallagher molested boys including one identified as "Ben" whose family is expected to file the wrongful death suit. His family maintains that Ben committed suicide after archdiocesan officials dismissed his abuse allegations that he made to them in 2007.

Attorneys in the case are Dan Monhan of Chester County and Marci Hamilton of Bucks County who are working in conjunction with Jeff Anderson, an internationally-known expert in sexual abuse litigation based in St. Paul, Minn. They are also representing Frank Finnegan of Collingdale in a lawsuit against archdiocesan officials in connection with alleged abuse when he was a boy at St. Francix Xavier parish, Philadelphia, by the now-late Rev. John Kline.

The recent grand jury investigation, that was launched by District Attorney Seth Williams, resulted in the Feb. 10 arrest of two priests, one former priest and a former Catholic school lay teacher for sexually assaulting two boys in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Also arrested for endangering the welfare of children was the Rev. Monsignor William Lynn, who, as secretary of the clergy under the former Philadelphia archbishop, Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua, was responsible for investigating clerical sexual abuse. He is reportedly the highest ranking U.S. church official ever charged with child endangerment.

Will they ever change?

http://www.alternet.org/news/150425/new_sex_abuse_scandals_plague_catholic_institutions_--_will_the_church_ever_change
New Sex Abuse Scandals Plague Catholic Institutions -- Will the Church Ever Change?
Why do these abuses keep popping up even after earnest vows of reform from the church?
March 29, 2011 |
Fact file a US priest accused of molesting 200 children, and the Vatican's actions after it received complaints in the 1990s while the current pope was head of the Catholic Church's morals watchdog. The pedophile priest crisis has cost the Roman Catholic church nearly $3 billion in the US, but only a fraction of the perpetrators have been jailed and little done to punish those who covered it up.Photo Credit: AFP/Graphic - Martin Megino/Gal/Js LIKE THIS ARTICLE ?
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TAKE ACTIONPetitions by Change.org|Get Widget|Start a Petition � It’s been years since the massive wave of Catholic clergy-abuse stories began to break, with victims speaking out and horrors uncovered. It’s true that instances of traumatizing sexual and physical abuse from clergy in many other religions and denominations have surfaced in the ensuing years, proving that the problem is hardly endemic to one religion or group of people. But in Catholic strongholds where abuse was widespread, the problem has been systemic, and the coverup attempts by the church are egregious and often premeditated and coordinated. Centralized hierarchies have led to centralized denial--until recent years, when there has been a centralized attempt to clean house.

Nowadays, the subject of child abuse by the clergy is often one broached by standup comedians and cynics. A disconnect is growing between the American Catholic church and its followers, and not just on this issue: study after study shows that Catholic laypeople are aligned with the rest of the American population--and against the church--when it comes to “social issues” abortion, especially birth control (which a vast majority use, directly countering church doctrine) and now even gay marriage.

Yet the clergy abuse stories continue to unfold in the arenas of church politics, law enforcement and the religious landscape. The last big scandal was in Wisconsin, when abuse at a school for the deaf was revealed, and more have surfaced since.

Just this week a record financial settlement was reached with abuse victims in the Northwest, while the Philadelphia abuse scandal continued. Last Friday alone, the New York Times published three separate stories about Catholic clergy abuse cases; a Google news search for “Catholic priest abuse” revealed ongoing or recently concluded cases in Connecticut, California, Tennessee and the Midwest--and these are just domestic cases. In Ireland, the entire nation remains up in arms about a “smoking gun” document which revealed, essentially, that the coverup of abuses there was sanctioned by the Vatican.

And that culture of denial and collusion that has been so slow to change may explain why these stories keep popping up even after earnest vows of reform from the church. A system that worked for decades one way may not be able to transform overnight--particularly when many of the power dynamics remain the same.

The Philly 21

Two Times stories were related to the unfolding case in Philadelphia, in which a grand jury found that “ the archdiocese allowed 37 priests accused of abuse or inappropriate behavior to remain in ministry.” As a result, a few weeks ago the church suspended 21 clergy or teachers now being referred to by some as “the Philly 21” or “the Philadelphia 21.”

This was after a new system of “review” boards had been implemented by the church (in the wake of other scandals) to root out exactly this kind of problem. But the review boards, staffed by outsiders with experience in law enforcement and accountable to church authorities, found no problem in Philadelphia even where the legal system found many.

A criminal proceeding is beginning against several church officials, including a monsignor, two priests, one former priest, and a former school teacher under the parochial purview:

“The priests and the schoolteacher are already accused of rape; the monsignor, William Lynn, the highest-ranking official to be accused of a crime in the three-decade-long abuse scandal in the United States, is suspected of covering up rape by the priests and is charged with child endangerment.”

One of the stories in the Times described a “blistering courtroom session” at a preliminary hearings for the case, at which the monsignor was repeatedly told by the judge that it could jeopardize his own interest to have a defense team sponsored by the archdiocese itself--which would have a vested interest not in him, but in the church. Nonetheless, he insisted on retaining that defense.

A second article about the Philadelphia case on Friday examined whether this spreading scandal proved that the work many American ecclesiastical authorities had put in establishing their own review protocols was in vain, if such internal reviews simply couldn’t pick up on the abuse. Supposedly, a new “zero tolerance” era had been launched after the Boston Diocese debacle at the beginning of this decade. But the fact that these review boards have no legal subpoena power and can only use documents and evidence that is voluntarily handed to them of course, is a huge part of the problem.

Northwest Nightmare

On Friday another case came to a close. This time it was a less recent one--a Jesuit order in the Northwest settled a longstanding case for $166 million against a group of nearly 500 abuse victims, mostly from the disadvantaged and vulnerable group of Alaskan and American natives, many of whom were orphans. The abuse took place decades ago. It has been strongly implied by victim’s advocate groups, the Times reported, that the remoteness of some of the parishes and schools and the socially isolated position of the students and families there meant that “problem priests” were shipped to the area to be out of people’s way, with little regard to the potential victims awaiting them there.

Attorney Blaine Tamaki gave a sharp statement to reporters, pointing out that the financial payout and the number of victims makes this a record-setting settlement--hardly a memorable milestone for the church.

"The $166.1 million is the largest settlement by a religious order in the history of the world. Over 450 Native American children ... were sexually abused repeatedly, from rape to sodomy, for decades throughout the Northwest,” Tamaki told the press, according to CNN. “Instead of teaching these children how to read and write, Jesuit priests were teaching them distrust and shame. Instead of teaching the Native American children the love of God, these Jesuit pedophile priests were molesting these young children.”

Why?

In the last decade, many have speculated that the Catholic attitude toward sex (only for procreation, not for pleasure), sin and repentance and the celibacy requirement for clergy are a source of the problem. But it’s impossible to generalize or to pinpoint the cause. Instead what can be said is that in order for abuses of power to end, conceptions and distribution of power needs to change--particularly in a system which is hierarchical and authority-based and the ultimate authority is theoretically derived from a divine source. It's no coincidence that many of the abuse victims were poor or alone or unable in some way to fight back, and that their abusers had a vast network of resources behind them.

This heartfelt search for answers from Maureen Martinez, a Catholic woman in Philadelphia goes over all the doctrinal possibilities, the issue of celibacy, of mentally ill men hoping to find shelter in the church as priests, and settles at last on the core problem of power:

“And this is the heart of the issue with the church: Offenders feel they are invincible. And their higher-ups who covered up the crimes also feel they are invincible. In fact, one could argue that the bishops and cardinals who knowingly shuffled sex offenders from one parish to another are even more at fault. They are not mentally ill.”

Undetected

http://www.npr.org/2011/03/29/134953417/how-priests-accused-of-abuse-can-go-undetected
How Priests Accused Of Abuse Can Go Undetected
by Barbara Bradley Hagerty

March 29, 2011

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Matt Rourke/AP
Catherine Coleman Murphy, of Lansdale, Pa., and Jack Wintermyer, of Silver Spring, Md., protest outside Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul in Philadelphia the day after the Philadelphia archdiocese suspended 21 priests who were named by a grand jury as child molestation subjects.


Matt Rourke/AP Catherine Coleman Murphy, of Lansdale, Pa., and Jack Wintermyer, of Silver Spring, Md., protest outside Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul in Philadelphia the day after the Philadelphia archdiocese suspended 21 priests who were named by a grand jury as child molestation subjects.
text size A A A March 29, 2011 A couple of years ago, the Philadelphia archdiocese heard about three priests who had allegedly raped two boys. It gave the priests' files to law enforcement, and a grand jury began to investigate. Then, the grand jury stumbled on a bombshell. A church employee testified that there were many other priests the panel should know about.

"The grand jury found that a policy of zero tolerance was not actually in effect," says District Attorney Seth Williams, "and that there were many priests that had allegations made against them that were still in active ministry."

There were 37 priests, according to a scathing report by the grand jury, which was released last month. Shaken by accusations that it was trying to keep abusers in ministry without telling parishes, the archdiocese moved quickly: It hired Gina Maisto Smith, a former prosecutor with a specialty in child sex abuse cases, to investigate further. The church soon put 21 clergy on administrative leave.

Smith is unable to speak to the specific cases, but she says she has seen no evidence that church officials intentionally protected sexual predators.

"I can say with clarity that I saw the archdiocese doing what it could do within the systems that it had and making the best decisions they could under the circumstances," she says.

This raises the question: With all the safeguards the Roman Catholic Church put into place after the sex abuse scandal in 2002, how could this happen? If the archdiocese was following all the right procedures, how did these priests fall through the cracks?


Ways To Fall


It turns out that there's a lot of play in the rules, says Terry McKiernan, president of Bishop Accountability.org, a watchdog group. He says when an allegation comes in the church, the bishop doesn't have to pursue it very far.

"A bishop may decide at a very early stage that an allegation is without merit," he says. "And if he does that, we never even get to the stage of a priest being removed."


Enlarge
Matt Rourke/AP
Archbishop of Philadelphia Cardinal Justin Rigali, who suspended the priests named in the grand jury's report, said he was "truly sorry" for harm done to victims and members of the community for "this great evil and crime."


Matt Rourke/AP Archbishop of Philadelphia Cardinal Justin Rigali, who suspended the priests named in the grand jury's report, said he was "truly sorry" for harm done to victims and members of the community for "this great evil and crime."
McKiernan says he believes that's what happened in Philadelphia. He notes that the archdiocese forwarded only seven of the 21 cases to its review board, a panel of lay people who are supposed to hear every allegation of sexual abuse and act to protect the victims. Often, he says, the review board "doesn't know all the facts" because it is the bishop or his senior officials who decide which cases to present to the board.

Moreover, McKiernan and others say review boards sometimes "hold their punches" because they are handpicked by the bishop. In fact, the grand jury report excoriated the Philadelphia review board because it rejected every allegation it did hear as "unsubstantiated."

Philadelphia may not be alone, says William Gavin, a former FBI agent who was hired by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops to audit each of the 195 Catholic dioceses each year and make sure they're preventing and reporting sex abuse cases. "It was an audit in quotes," he says. "I think it was more of a program review than anything else."

Gavin says he could ask whether a diocese is conducting background checks on priests and employees — but he was not allowed to look at records that would indicate whether there were any allegations against a priest.

"We didn't have the benefit of drilling down into personnel files to see what might be there," Gavin says. "They were off limits."

Gavin and his auditors had to depend on a bishop's word about whether anyone had been accused of abuse. In addition, the questionnaire they use wouldn't have spotted the Philadelphia 21 anyway. It only asks about allegations within the past year, not older cases.

Independent Reviews


Some believe the only way to get real answers is to have an outsider look at the priests' files.

"The only reason we know about this situation in Philadelphia is because a grand jury report has been issued, and a grand jury process has been looking at this archdiocese for years," McKiernan says. "I think if we had that kind of aggressive law enforcement in other dioceses, the same problems would be revealed."

McKiernan says they already have. In Cleveland, for example, the diocese said that 28 priests had been accused of abuse, but when a prosecutor looked at the files, the estimate went to 145.
When the New Hampshire attorney general looked at the files of the diocese of Manchester, 27 new names emerged.

And McKiernan has obtained an internal 2009 document from the Boston archdiocese that says there were 40 credibly accused priests whose names are still unknown to the public.

Even critics say that most dioceses are trying to do their best at protecting victims and still giving due process to priests who may have been wrongly accused. And that can be a difficult line to walk.

"Many people think the archdiocese doesn't get it," says Donna Farrell, a spokesperson for the archdiocese of Philadelphia. "We do. And the task, the job ahead of us, is to recognize where we've fallen short — and to let our actions speak to our resolve."

The faithful will surely be watching — and so will prosecutors.

Grand Jury Report

http://www.bishop-accountability.org/reports/2003_09_25_First_Philadelphia_Grand_Jury_Report.pdf

3rd report

http://washingtonexaminer.com/news/2011/03/victims-group-releases-3rd-report-priest-abuse
Victims group releases 3rd report on priest abuse
By: The Associated Press 03/29/11 2:46 PM
The Associated Press
By: AP Photo/Matt Rourke
Barbara Blaine, President of Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests (SNAP), displays childhood photographs of adults who say they were sexually abused, during a news conference Tuesday, March 29, 2011, in Philadelphia. The national victims group SNAP has released a previously undisclosed grand jury report on sexually abusive priests in Philadelphia.
The national victims group SNAP has released a previously undisclosed grand jury report on sexually abusive priests in Philadelphia.
The Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests says the 2003 document affirms what two later grand juries found: that abusive Roman Catholic priests were protected and transferred among parishes.
She says it's an interim report from a grand jury whose 18-month time limit had expired. A second grand jury continued the investigation; it released a scathing 2005 report that includes material from the 2003 document.
Another grand jury report this year led to criminal charges against three priests and others.
The Philadelphia Archdiocese declined comment due to a gag order.


Read more at the Washington Examiner: http://washingtonexaminer.com/news/2011/03/victims-group-releases-3rd-report-priest-abuse#ixzz1I59fpsdy

RtP

http://www.americamagazine.org/blog/entry.cfm?blog_id=2&entry_id=4067RtP in the church
Posted at: Tuesday, March 29, 2011 02:10:28 PM
Author: Kevin Clarke

I spoke of the responsibility to protect at the international level in the preceding post. The sorry tale of Father Donald Maguire, S.J., recounted in today's NY Times, depicts a profound failure of RtP at a smaller scale (albeit one no less devastating to the victims described here). What else can be said about such things that haven't already be said? To read this tale as a parent and try to imagine the thinking of the administrators of this dangerous man who persisted in discounting the damage he was capable of inflicting and in ignoring decades of warning signs and malevolent behavior . . . it is beyond mind-boggling. Discouraging vocations among gay men has become the preferred focus for "fixing" this problem of abuse, but chasing gay men away from or out of the priesthood won't do anything to correct the institutional failures and almost pathological nonchalance and indifference described here in the handling of a monster like Maguire and too many like him (oh, and good luck managing the church without its many gay priests).

From the NY Times:

Jesuit leaders in Chicago largely ignored or kept secret numerous reports, spanning four decades, that a prominent priest was sexually abusing teenage boys, lawyers for victims charged on Monday in a motion for punitive damages in a Chicago court.

Included in the motion were more than 65 recently obtained church documents and depositions that, the lawyers said, demonstrated “a reckless disregard for the safety of others in the face of repeated reports of sexual misconduct” on the part of Chicago Jesuit leaders.

The former priest, Donald J. McGuire, now 80, was convicted on several counts of sex abuse in state and federal courts in 2006 and 2008, and is serving a 25-year federal sentence.

The newly public documents date from the early 1960s, when a concerned Austrian priest, in imperfect English, first observed in a letter to Chicago Jesuits that Father McGuire, newly ordained and studying in Europe, had “much relations with several boys.” The reports extend into the last decade, when Father McGuire reportedly ignored admonitions to stop traveling with young assistants, molesting one as late as 2003, as law enforcement was closing in. The legal motion argues that Father McGuire’s superiors in Chicago turned “a blind eye to his criminal actions.”

You can read the rest here, if you have the stomach for it, but you can probably guess the rest at this point.

Schools

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/Catholic-church-to-lose-stronghold-on-Irish-education-system-118832599.html
Catholic church to lose stronghold on Irish education system
Church patronage of schools to undergo over haul

Published Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 8:21 AMUpdated Tuesday, March 29, 2011, 8:21 AM

i<( <

Crucifix hanging on a classroom wall - The Church may soon have no place in Irish schools
Photo by Google Images
READ MORE- The Irish are fast losing their religion say experts

READ MORE - Irelands Census 2011 and Catholicism - the demise of organized religion in Ireland

Ireland’s Minister for Education, Ruairí Quinn, has established an expert group to examine how the majority of primary schools will be moved from Catholic Church patronage.

The minister has said he wants more than 50 percent of the Ireland’s schools currently under Church patronage to move to an alternative guardianship.

The Catholic church controls about 90 percent of the State’s 3,200 primary schools.

Professor John Coolahan, from the National University of Maynooth will chair the forum, which will have its first meeting this coming May.

Dr Coolahan will be supported by Fionnuala Kilfeather, former chief executive of the National Parents' Council, and Dr Caroline Hussey, former registrar and deputy president at UCD.

The working group will advice the new minister on a range of issues to ensure that primary schools in Ireland can cater for all religions, as well as the practicalities of how to transfer patronage.

The forum will also include input from various patronage bodies, Irish Primary Principals' Network, the Irish National Teachers Organization and other stakeholders including parents. It will also take submissions from the public.

"This forum is really to discuss the mechanisms and modality whereby a school under patronage of one body – let’s say the Catholic Church - would come to an orderly decision to transfer that patronage to another patron body in a manner that does not damage the educational experience of the children or indeed the operational or working arrangements of the teachers and parents involved,” he told RTÉ radio yesterday.

READ MORE- The Irish are fast losing their religion say experts

READ MORE - Irelands Census 2011 and Catholicism - the demise of organized religion in Ireland

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

More abuse

http://bilgrimage.blogspot.com/2011/03/questions-continue-to-arise-post.html
Questions Continue to Arise, Post-Philadelphia, As New Abuse Stories Break





Several good overviews in recent days of the questions we're left with after Philadelphia, where it has become apparent that a significant number of priests credibly accused of abuse have been left in active ministry, despite assurances of the U.S. bishops that we now have a well-functioning system in place to remove such priests from ministry:




As Laurie Goodstein and Tom Roberts report recently in the New York Times and National Catholic Reporter, the Philadelphia news, and the indictment of that archdiocese's secretary for clergy Msgr. William Lynn on charges of endangering the welfare of children, come as a shock to many U.S. Catholics, since we've been told by the bishops that the abuse situation is a thing of the past, that it's under control. Among the questions Goodstein and Roberts report American Catholics are now asking (and have to ask), post-Philadelphia:


1. Do the review boards set up by dioceses to review allegations of clerical abuse of minors receive all pertinent information from diocesan clergy files? Are files scrubbed of some information before they reach reviewers' hands?

2. Since the annual audit completely missed the 37 priests in the Philadelphia archdiocese who have apparently continued in ministry despite credible allegations of abuse of minors, is the audit system functioning? Is there any assurance that auditors have access to all information they need in every diocese to do their job?

3. How are review boards selected, and what independence do they actually have from diocesan control as they do their review work?

4. Are all the standards and norms of the 2002 Dallas charter actually being applied uniformly in dioceses across the nation?

5. And--to me, most ominous of all--how many other situations like Philadelphia are still out there?


In my opinion (and I've linked to a statement of Peter Isely of SNAP suggesting this--see here), Philadelphia is not unique. On a daily basis, new indicators come out of an abysmal lack of accountability and transparency among the pastoral leaders of American Catholicism, vis-a-vis the abuse crisis. Two examples from the past day or so:


It was announced yesterday that St. John's Benedictine Abbey in Minnesota has just reached a settlement with nine victims of abuse at its St. John's Prep School in Collegeville. The abuse situation at St. John's has been in the public eye for some years now. Several years ago, Patrick Marker, who was abused as a teen at the prep school, created a website to track what has happened at St. John's, and to make it known to the public. The website, Behind the Pine Curtain, does outstanding work gathering information about St. John's Abbey and the abuse situation at this institution, and making that information available to the public.


Marker served for several years on an external review board at St. John's, and then resigned when, as he indicates, the abbey's abbot withheld information on credibly accused monks from the public and other board members supported this action. And as he maintains now that a settlement has just been reached with some victims of abuse by members of this monastic community, the problem of a lack of transparency and accountability remains, in his view, even with this settlement:


What they're doing is reacting. They haven't been active in addressing this problem. Names that they knew back in 2002 were not part of the public release back then. The external review board that they created as part of that 2002 settlement was a farce. And I was very hopeful in 2002 that we would see change and that St. John's would turn the corner. It didn't happen.


That's one alarming indicator from very recent news which suggests to me that the Philadelphia story is hardly unique--that there continue to be many situations within the American Catholic church in which a refusal of pastoral officials to behave pastorally, to be transparent and accountable re: abuse cases, still hampers the attempts of American Catholics to address the abuse crisis.


And here's another: just yesterday, a poster commenting on this blog, Augusta Wynn, logged in to say that the Corapi story reminded her of the story of another rock-star priest given free rein to roam the globe as he provided spiritual direction to various religious communities, including Mother Teresa's community. The priest to whom Wynn is referring is Jesuit Fr. Donald McGuire, who, according to Wynn, brought in much money for his community's coffers, and may have had unusual latitude to pursue his ministry (which was dogged for years by persistent credible reports of abuse of teenaged boys) because he was a cash cow for the Jesuits.


And immediately after this blogger alerted me to the story of Donald McGuire, about which I knew nothing, news began to break about a case filed against him yesterday, which claims that the Jesuits long knew of McGuire's abuse of minors, and did little to curb the abuse or protect minors McGuire targeted. Erik Erickholm reports on this case today in the New York Times, and the Bishop-Accountability site has just uploaded an important cache of documents tracking the Jesuit cover-up (for years) of McGuire's abuse.


The common thread of these two very recent post-Philadelphia stories? It's still going on. The cover-up continues. There is still a shocking lack of accountability among the pastoral leaders of American Catholicism, vis-a-vis abuse of minors. Clericalism--the belief that priests attain some ontologically superior status through ordination, which sets them above common lay Catholics and gives them power and privilege that flow from the change in their ontological status effected by ordination--remains front and center in all of these breaking stories of abuse.


And it's everywhere. It's not only in Philadelphia. It runs throughout the Catholic church in the U.S.


And it's still enabled by far too many American Catholics, some of whom have logged into this blog in recent days to slam open discussion of how clericalism and the adulation of rock-star priests feed the abuse situation and its cover-up, and who have suggested we need to shut up, stop our idiotic yammering, and pray, pay, and keep obeying.


And so, for me, another of the questions to be added to the list of questions the Philadelphia story raises is this: how have some American Catholics gotten so stupid? And so morally doltish? So morally doltish that they'd continue to put the reputations (and cash-flow needs) of venal rock-star priests or bishops and religious superiors ahead of the safety of children (or adults under pastoral care) who are endangered by predatory priests?


Until American Catholics deal with that question, too, I don't think we'll make much headway in addressing the abuse situation in any effective way?

2 years

http://www.oregonlive.com/beaverton/index.ssf/2011/03/former_valley_catholic_high_school_tennis_coach_gets_nearly_two_years_in_prison_in_child_pornography.html
Former Valley Catholic High School tennis coach gets nearly two years in prison in child pornography case
Published: Monday, March 28, 2011, 3:43 PM Updated: Monday, March 28, 2011, 4:08 PM
By Rebecca Woolington, The Oregonian The Oregonian
WCSOChristopher Rijken
The case: A tennis coach at Valley Catholic High School on May 18 was arrested on charges that he took nude pictures of an underage girl.

Christopher Rijken, 27, of Beaverton, was arrested on charges of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct and encouraging child sexual abuse and was lodged in the Washington County Jail.

Rijken convinced a teenager to remove her clothes while the two were in the vicinity of the Portland Rose Garden near the Oregon Zoo, according to an affidavit filed in Washington County Circuit Court. The affidavit, filed by Beaverton police, says he told the girl to lift up her shirt.

When she questioned him, the affidavit says, he told her she had to do what he asked. She then removed her clothing, the affidavit says, and Rijken took pictures.

Rijken reportedly burned two CDs of the pictures and gave one of them to the girl. The affidavit says Rijken gave his laptop, iPhone and external hard drive to a friend.

According to the affidavit, he told police that the sexually suggestive photos were taken in the woods behind Catlin Gabel School.

Rijken's MySpace page said he worked as an assistant head coach at Valley Catholic and as a sales associate at Nike. His MySpace page also said he formerly worked as a receptionist and instructor at Tualatin Hills Tennis Center.

Update: A Washington County Grand Jury on May 25 indicted Rijken on four counts of using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct and four counts of first-degree encouraging child sexual abuse, according to court records. Using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct is a Measure 11 crime that carries a mandatory minimum prison sentence of five years and 10 months.

As part of a plea agreement, Rijken last week pleaded guilty to one count of attempted using a child in a display of sexually explicit conduct and two counts of first-degree encouraging child sexual abuse, said Washington County Deputy District Attorney Kevin Barton, who prosecuted the case. His other charges were dismissed.

Sentence: Rijken was sentenced to one year and eight months in prison, with three years post-prison supervision, Barton said. As part of his supervision, Rijken must undergo sex offender evaluations and treatment.

Rijken also may not use computers or cell phones with computer capabilities, Barton said, and is not allowed to have contact with the victim or minors. He may not frequent schools or work as a teacher, coach or in any other capacity with children under his supervision, Barton said.

Rijken will also be required to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.

Afghan women

http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/mar/27/afghan-women-rights-afghanistan-peace
Afghan women are still at riskAnti-violence measures have been agreed but the safety and rights of women and girls are not protected on the ground


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Ivan Simonovic guardian.co.uk, Sunday 27 March 2011 14.00 BST Article history
Many abused Afghan women are afraid to seek help. Photograph: Jalil Rezayee/EPA

Sima is 15 but looks younger. I met her in Kabul, in the female juveniles section of the Badam Bagh prison. She talks very little, but her eyes are full of grief. A defence lawyer told me it was likely she had been raped.

What is Sima's crime? She is serving her sentence for running away from domestic violence. About half of all women in Afghan prisons are there for the same "crime". Some of them are in prison with their babies. The youngest ones are no older than 12. Having spent time in jail, they will rarely be accepted back by their families and communities.

Ten years since the Taliban fled Kabul, while new laws, policies and development aid have brought some benefits to Afghan women, deep-rooted challenges remain. The Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights recently issued a report on harmful traditional practices against women and girls in Afghanistan. About half of women get married before the age of 15. It is estimated that 70-80% of marriages are forced. Selling girls or giving them away in settlement of a conflict is common practice. The literacy rate of Afghan girls of 15 or more is just 12%. Unsurprisingly, violence and abusive behaviour against them is widespread.

Afghanistan has ratified the convention on the elimination of discrimination against women, but its initial report is long overdue. A law on elimination of violence against women has been adopted recently, but its enforcement is a real challenge: victims are reluctant to seek help from police officers, 99% of whom are male.

So, what can they do when they face abuse? Desperate girls and women all too often commit suicide, an increasing number of them by self-immolation. Those who have the courage to run away and seek refuge within their family are often returned to their abusive husbands or parents. The ones who try to find a safe haven at their neighbours' or friends' houses face criminal charges for the intent to commit zina (adultery, or sexual relations out of marriage). The punishment is not provided by law – nor, I was told by experts, is it consistent with sharia, which requires witnesses and proof. It is based merely on an instruction of the supreme court of Afghanistan. The only safe haven for victims are NGO-run shelters for women and girls, yet Afghan authorities have recently threatened their continued operation.

I visited the oldest shelter in Afghanistan and talked to the girls and women under its protection. It was heartbreaking to hear their pleas for the maintenance of the shelters, as they are the only places they can go: "If this place is closed, I have no option then to kill myself", a young women told me. I raised the issue with President Karzai, who assured me that the number of shelters would not be reduced and that he was in favour of government financially supporting NGO-run shelters.

The UN security council has adopted a resolution extending the mandate of the UN assistance mission in Afghanistan. It "strongly condemns" continuing discrimination against women and girls; calls for enhanced efforts to secure their rights; and supports women's shelters. It also addresses the main problem: empowerment of Afghan women and ensuring that women's rights are an integral part of peace, reintegration and reconciliation efforts. If girls are not educated and women not included in political life, public administration and the justice system, traditional harmful practices will continue and their human rights will never be protected. Only if they are present and active in peace talks can they rest assured that even the modest gains secured to date will not be used as bargaining chips.

For peace to be sustainable and just, both Taliban and women should sit at the negotiating table and be included in shaping decisions on the future of Afghanistan.

Another charge

http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/news/coventry-news/2011/03/29/man-claims-to-be-victim-of-jailed-coventry-pervert-priest-92746-28421530/

Man claims to be victim of jailed Coventry pervert priest

Mar 29 2011
0ShareANOTHER man has come forward to claim he was a victim of former Coventry priest James Robinson.

The 73-year-old was jailed for 21 years at Birmingham Crown Court last October after being found guilty of multiple sex offences against six boys, as young as 10.

His trial followed a lengthy extradition process after he fled to America amid abuse rumours in the 1980s.

The Telegraph previously reported how two new victims came forward before Robinson’s trial but action could not be taken in relation to their claims.

Anna Wheeler, a senior prosecutor with West Midlands Crown Prosecution Service’s Complex Casework Unit, extradited Robinson to face justice.

Ms Wheeler revealed two new victims had come forward before the trial and another afterwards.

She explained there will be no further prosecution, although their evidence is “entirely believable”.

She said: “One of two new victims who came forward just before the trial had previously sued the Church over his abuse. He didn’t wish to be involved in the court case.

‘‘The other person was unable mentally to cope with the idea of court proceedings.’’

Ms Wheeler added that one other person had come forward to claim they had been abused by Robinson after he was jailed.


Read More http://www.coventrytelegraph.net/news/coventry-news/2011/03/29/man-claims-to-be-victim-of-jailed-coventry-pervert-priest-92746-28421530/#ixzz1HzWqQkhz

Priest accused

http://www.620wtmj.com/news/local/118828859.html
Man To Detail Alleged Abuse by Priest
Story Created: Mar 29, 2011

(Story Updated: Mar 29, 2011 )

WEST ALLIS - A man from West Allis was expected to come forward on Tuesday and detail his claims of being abused while a student at St. Nicholas Parish in Milwaukee.

The man alleges that Fr. Laurin Wenig sexually abused him as a child.

Because of the allegations, Fr. Wenig was removed from active ministry at St. Mary's in Elm Grove.

Fr. Wenig denies the man's claims.

Polish pedopriest

http://www.thenews.pl/national/artykul152225_priest-in-paedophilia-trial.html
Priest in paedophilia trial

29.03.2011 12:37


A former pastor from the coastal resort town of Kolobrzeg is in court today accused of two counts of unlawful sexual acts with minors.



Owing to requests from both the plaintiffs and the defendant, the case will remain closed to journalists.



The priest stands charged with performing a sexual act on a 14-year-old boy in 1999, and an 11-year-old boy in the years 2000-2001.



The accused is pleading not guilty to the charges.



The pastor served in Kolobrzeg between 1998 and 2008. However, he was dismissed from his post by the Church for allegedly breaking his vows of celibacy with an adult man.



If found guilty, the priest could face ten years in prison. (mg)

Statute of limitations

http://www.kimatv.com/news/local/118814499.html
Statute of Limitations Hinders Sexual Abuse Cases
Tools0 CommentsEmail this articleFacebookDiggPrint this article By Ryan Simms Story Published: Mar 28, 2011 at 6:21 PM PDT
YAKIMA -- KIMA is following up on the massive sexual abuse settlement involving the Jesuit society.

Multimedia Watch The Video Many of you wondered why father John Morse, accused of molesting 38 people, hasn't faced any charges.

We learned the statute of limitations expired on all the cases against him.

Lawyers say it's a problem that happens all too often in sexual abuse cases.

KIMA learned there is a bill in Olympia that would do away with the statute of limitations for sexual abuse cases.

It's currently being heard in a house committee.

Prosecute

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/editorials/2014623240_edit29church.html
Prosecute the Catholic sex-abuse scandals
Promised reforms in the wake of the Roman Catholic Church's sex-abuse scandals should not insulate priests and bishops from legal accountability. Prosecute those accused of sex offensives and send the guilty to jail. Church leaders have repeatedly demonstrated their loyalty is to their vocation, not church members.

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AFTER decades of silence, deceit and settlements, the Roman Catholic Church's sexual-abuse scandal might finally be headed where it truly belongs, U.S. criminal courts.

Church leadership has been granted extraordinary latitude in handling epic cases of sexual assault against children who put their innocence and trust in religious figures who violated them, sometimes for years. Again and again, bishops invested more loyalty in the clergy responsible for the assaults than in the people in the pews.

Last week, a $166 million settlement was announced for victims abused by Jesuit priests on Northwest tribal lands and in remote Alaskan villages. Affirmation of their suffering and belated accountability for their exploiters will mean as much as the eventual financial payouts.

But real progress came across the country in Philadelphia, where a judge approved requests by the district attorney to move ahead in a case involving accusations of rape and conspiracy involving clergy, and a subsequent cover-up by a senior church official.

In a related development, The New York Times reports a grand jury in Philadelphia found as many as 37 priests accused of sexual abuse or inappropriate behavior were allowed to continue serving in the priesthood. The church's local review boards were in the dark about the failures to adhere to decade-old guidelines that came out of a horrific scandal in Boston.

In the U.S. and elsewhere, the church was given authority and deference it did not deserve and repeatedly violated in the handling of cases that date back decades. Instances of abuse are still being revealed. Unconscionable acts with injurious results have been met with the most hypocritical behavior.

The church's response has amounted to an international cover-up for heinous acts from California to Connecticut, as well as Australia, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, Ireland and Germany.

Worldwide the pattern has been to hide the truth, mount counterattacks about Catholic bashing and stall.

The outside world did not sully a sacred vocation. No more operating above the law. Turn those accused of assault and abuse over to secular authorities. Send the guilty to jail.

Settlement

http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-clergy-sex-abuse-0329-20110328,0,4825450.story
Settlement In Priest Abuse Case Revealed
Alleged victim serving time for murder

David Clohessy of SNAPnetwork.org, a survivors network for people abused by priests, wipes his eyes outside of St. Joseph's Cathedral during a moment of silence for victims of abuse. Clohessy met with members of the press outside the church today to urge Catholic Archbishops to disclose names of dangerous clerics. (MARK MIRKO / HARTFORD COURANT / March 28, 2011)

Hartford, CT, USA
By DAVE ALTIMARI, daltimar@courant.com

The Hartford Courant

6:00 p.m. EDT, March 28, 2011
E-mail Print Share Text Size hc-clergy-sex-abuse-0329-20110328
A convicted murderer serving a 60-year sentence in Maine for killing his grandfather received a secret settlement from the Hartford Archdiocese after charging that a Bristol priest sexually abused him when he was a teenager, an advocacy group revealed Monday.

Although the undisclosed settlement was paid to Jeffrey Libby in 2009, the leaders of a priest abuse survivors' group held a press conference Monday in front of the archdiocese's Farmington Avenue headquarters to call on Bishop Henry J. Mansell to acknowledge the settlement. They also urged the Catholic Church to disclose what happened to the priest who allegedly abused Libby in the early 1980's.

The priest served as parish priest in Bristol and Plainville. Maria Zone, a spokeswoman for the archdiocese, said Monday that the priest was placed on administrative leave in 2005, which means he cannot function as a priest.



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Zone would not comment on why he was placed on leave or his current whereabouts. She said the diocese is still paying him a stipend. Zone said the diocese's policy is not to comment on specific settlements.

"It is important that the public know that the Archdiocese of Hartford is doing everything possible to keep our youth safe,'' Zone said. "Child sexual abuse is a despicable crime, which will not be tolerated."

Zone said that all parish employees and volunteers over the age of 18 who have regular contact with children must complete a curriculum called the, "Safe Environment Program" which includes background checks as well as a training session on sexual abuse awareness.

Survivor's Network of Priest Abuse (SNAP) National President David Clohessy acknowledged that Libby's case is rather unusual because he is a convicted killer, but said he had no doubt that his allegations are true.

"In my 23 years that I have been doing this work this is one of the worst cases. Jeff was abused in the most horrific ways over 200 times,'' Clohessy said. "Why would the diocese pay a substantial settlement to settle a lawsuit that was not even filed yet with a convicted murderer unless they were convinced that he was telling the truth?''

Clohessy, who said the settlement amount is confidential although he categorized it as "far more than $20,000," spoke to Libby a few weeks ago. The group decided to publicize his case because of concerns about the priest's whereabouts.

Although the settlement was made quietly, Libby has been using it in his efforts to get out of prison early. He is serving a 60-year sentence for drowning his grandfather in 1986.

Under Maine law, Libby would not be eligible for clemency until he has served 30 years of his sentence. He has filed a petition asking that his sentence be commuted now based primarily on the abuse, which he didn't tell anybody about at the time of his sentencing.

His petition was denied, according to Richard Olsen, his attorney in Maine.

"They specifically told Jeff that there had never been any other allegations made against this priest and he was the only one, which was one reason he agreed to the settlement,'' Olsen said.

SNAP held press conferences at other sites Monday, including one in Rhode Island where it called on the state's Roman Catholic leader to release the names of all priests who have worked in Rhode Island and have been accused of sex abuse.

SNAP and BishopAccountability.org also urged Bishop Thomas Tobin to seek out victims of John Dority, a priest convicted of child molestation in Rhode Island in 2005. Dority was released from prison in 2007 and now lives in Coventry, according to the Connecticut State Police sex offender registry.

Elder abuse

http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/9341683/
Police: Dunn pastor assaulted assisted living center patient
Paul Burke JohnsonRELATEDAllegations against Dunn pastor came from assisted living center
Sexual misconduct charge rocks Harnett County church
Dunn pastor charged with sexual battery
NC Wanted: Read more crime news or report a tip
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Benson, N.C. — The sexual misconduct charges against a Harnett County pastor involved a patient at an assisted living center in Benson, police said Monday.

Paul Burke Johnson, 74, the pastor of Calvary Baptist Church in Dunn, was charged Thursday with four counts of misdemeanor sexual battery.

Benson Police Chief Kenneth Edwards said Johnson had visited patients at Liberty Commons Nursing Center, at 2315 N.C. Highway 242 North, for the past year and had several encounters with a 64-year-old woman there. The woman has a diminished mental capacity, Edwards said.

According to a statement released by police, Johnson had "repeated inappropriate sexual contact" with the woman and has "fully admitted his involvement in the incidents," which took place over the past four or five months.

A nurse at the facility witnessed an encounter between Johnson and the woman on Thursday and reported it to supervisors, who called police.

"At Liberty Commons, we take all allegations of potential abuse very seriously," administrator Jackie Livermore said in a statement.




The alleged encounters didn't involve intercourse or any contact that would constitute a felony, Edwards said, so Johnson was charged with misdemeanors.

Johnson, who was released after posting a $20,000 bond, did not show up at church Sunday.

"Right now everybody is just confused, upset. Everybody is in tears," church member James Norris said. "It's a tough time for everybody."

Johnson is also on the Board of Ministers for the Campbell University Divinity School. University President Jerry Wallace said Sunday that he had heard of the allegations but wasn't prepared to comment on them.

Johnson is scheduled to appear in court May 6.

Jesuits sued

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/29/us/29jesuit.html?_r=2&pagewanted=all

Suit Says Jesuits Ignored Warnings About PriestBy ERIK ECKHOLM
Published: March 28, 2011
Jesuit leaders in Chicago largely ignored or kept secret numerous reports, spanning four decades, that a prominent priest was sexually abusing teenage boys, lawyers fovictims charged on Monday in a motion for punitive damages in a Chicago court.

Enlarge This Image

Donald J. McGuire, later convicted of sexual abuse, above with John Doe 129 at his First Communion in 1985, in a photograph provided by John Doe 129.
Related
Catholic Order Reaches $166 Million Settlement With Sexual Abuse Victims (March 26, 2011)
Priests and Judge in Abuse Case Spar Over Legal Fees (March 15, 2011)
Enlarge This Image

Donald J. McGuire with Mother Teresa in 1991 in a photograph provided by John Doe 129.
Included in the motion were more than 65 recently obtained church documents and depositions that, the lawyers said, demonstrated “a reckless disregard for the safety of others in the face of repeated reports of sexual misconduct” on the part of Chicago Jesuit leaders.

The former priest, Donald J. McGuire, now 80, was convicted on several counts of sex abuse in state and federal courts in 2006 and 2008, and is serving a 25-year federal sentence.

The newly public documents date from the early 1960s, when a concerned Austrian priest, in imperfect English, first observed in a letter to Chicago Jesuits that Father McGuire, newly ordained and studying in Europe, had “much relations with several boys.” The reports extend into the last decade, when Father McGuire reportedly ignored admonitions to stop traveling with young assistants, molesting one as late as 2003, as law enforcement was closing in. The legal motion argues that Father McGuire’s superiors in Chicago turned “a blind eye to his criminal actions.”

The current case started with a civil suit brought by six men who say they were victims. Three have since settled with the Jesuits, but three others, identified as John Doe 117, John Doe 118 and John Doe 129, are still pursuing the suit against the Chicago Province of the Society of Jesus and Mr. McGuire. Most of the newly released documents were obtained in the discovery process for the suit: letters and memos the church was required to produce from its files, and transcripts of depositions.

The motion filed on Monday asks the Cook County Circuit Court to take the unusual step of considering additional, punitive damages, given what the motion says is the evidence of a long trail of credible warnings about the priest’s behavior and ineffective responses by church officials.

Terence McKiernan, president of BishopAccountability.org, a victim advocacy group that has long monitored the church’s response to sexual abuse charges, said that the series of warnings given to Jesuit leaders by parents and fellow priests was unusually long and clear.

“I have never seen such detailed and frequent notice received by the priest’s superiors, so many ‘directives’ regarding the priest’s future behavior, and so much evidence presented to his superiors that those directives were being violated, without the priest being removed from ministry,” Mr. McKiernan said.

His group has posted a history of the case and many of the key documents.

Mariah E. Moran, a lawyer for the Chicago Province, said she could not comment on the motion because she had not had a chance to study it, and a spokesman for the province did not respond to requests for comment. In depositions and settlement meetings over the last three years, senior Jesuit officials have said that until recent years they had not heard firm-enough evidence of sexual abuse to justify stronger action against Father McGuire.

Last week, the Jesuits’ Oregon Province agreed to pay $166 million to hundreds of victims of sexual abuse, which occurred decades ago at remote Indian boarding schools. The two cases shed rare light on how religious orders have dealt with charges of sexual abuse, as opposed to the Catholic dioceses and bishops at the center of most recent scandals. The Jesuits are the world’s largest Roman Catholic religious order.

The motion filed on Monday charges that the church misled prosecutors in 2006, with its lawyers claiming that they had little information about the priest — despite the lengthy record of complaints.

The case has been acutely troublesome for the Jesuits, an order known for its scholarship and its elite high schools and universities. Father McGuire was by all accounts a mesmerizing teacher, and after he was barred by some Jesuit schools in the 1960s and 1970s for suspicious behavior, including having students share his bedroom, he went on to became a popular leader of eight-day spiritual retreats around the country and the world.

For about two decades, starting in the early 1980s, he was a spiritual adviser to Mother Teresa, who put him in charge of retreats for the nuns in her worldwide order, Missionaries of Charity. Several times each year, in India, the United States, Russia and other countries, he led retreats for the sisters.

In these travels he routinely took along a teenage boy as an assistant, saying he needed help administering his diabetes treatment. In complaints voiced by some parents and priests at the time, and in later depositions, those assistants said their duties often included sleeping in the same bed as Father McGuire, showering and reading pornography together, providing intimate massages and watching him masturbate.

The Jesuits have their own administrative structure, with a leader in Rome and regional provinces in the United States, although they also operate with permission from local bishops.

On his return from Europe in the 1960s, Father McGuire was assigned to live and teach at Loyola Academy, a high school in Wilmette, Ill. Two boys stayed with him in his room for about two years each, where he constantly abused them, according to the 2006 trial.

In 1969 the second of those boys, then 15, ran away and described the abuse to his parish priest, who contacted the Jesuit president of the academy. The school responded by removing Father McGuire, but, according to a letter released on Monday, publicly described his departure as a “sabbatical.”

In 1991, in another of the many warnings revealed on Monday, the director of a retreat house in California reported to the Chicago Province’s leader that Father McGuire was traveling with a teenage boy from Alaska and sharing a bed with him, and that the boy’s mother had expressed her concern that “her son has in some way changed.”

That year, the Chicago Province’s leader, the Rev. Robert A. Wild, imposed the first set of “guidelines” on Father McGuire. In written instructions he said: “I ask that you not travel on any overnight trip with any boy or girl under the age of 18 and preferably even under the age of 21.” But Father McGuire was left to police himself, and Father Wild said in a 2009 deposition that he had regarded the case as “a serious matter” but also “ambiguous.”

The province sent Father McGuire in 1993 for a psychiatric examination and six months at a treatment center in Maryland — but in the week before he was to report for the evaluation, he was allowed to conduct a retreat in Phoenix, where he molested another boy, the documents indicate.

As late as 1998, the new documents show, the Chicago provincial wrote a letter of “good standing” for Father McGuire to allow him to minister in a diocese, stating that “there is nothing to our knowledge in his background which would restrict any ministry with minors.”

As the reports of abuse accumulated, the Chicago leaders issued one set of restrictions after another on Father McGuire, finally, in 2002, saying he could minister only to nuns in the Chicago region. But none of these directives were enforced, the court motion asserts.

Father McGuire was formally removed from the priesthood in February 2008 after a conviction in Wisconsin and after a federal indictment had been issued in Illinois.